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Game Development for Noobs: How to Organize Your Project Like a Pro+ 10 Tips

According to new data released by Newzoo, 2020’s global games market will generate revenues of $159.3 billion. Therefore, that, along with its “fun factor”, draws people toward the game industry like a siren’s call.The truth is, I have run into too many people who at some point decided that they wanted to enter game development. And they picked up an engine, and they started diving in and they quit before they ever finished their first game because the experience was just frustrating.

Newzoo 2020 Global Games Market Chart

According to Newzoo it is a good time to be a game developer! Without proper organization, the game development process may seem like it’s going nowhere. Pixune has quite a lot of collective game-making experience, so hopefully, some of our advice here will help you avoid the common pitfalls. So, let’s start with the most common and dangerous one. No matter the nature of your project, there are some principles that hold true.

These principles can be applied to any kind of project, but we have tailored them around the topic of Game Development. Finally, at the end of this article, we have recommended some game genres based on development difficulty to help you decide the genre for your first (next?) game project. If you have any questions about the stuff we talk about here, drop us a comment at the end. We will be more than happy to help out. Gamers gotta have each other’s back! First Step: Set a Realistic Scope The first thing you’re going to want is to be careful about scoping the project. Many people pick up a game engine dreaming of making the types of games they play. However, this often just is not possible. Games like “Sekiro” or “Witcher” are made by teams of at least 40 people, sometimes way more than 40 people, over the course of several years.

Game Development: Witcher 3

The amount of polish that went into Witcher 3 is staggering. Certainly not a 1-man job Even if you’re just amazing and you throw your whole life into creating your game, you’re not going to make a “The Last of Us” or a “Witcher”. Not even close, and especially not on your first attempt. Truth is, you’re not even going to create something like Super Mario Bros. as your first game. You *may* create like, 1 level’s worth of Super Mario. Start Simple Your goal with your first game development should be to get something built that you could actually play, even in the most rudimentary fashion, as soon as possible. Think of your first game as a learning exercise, not your masterwork. If your dream game is precious to you, then save it for when you’re ready, or you’ll make a mess of it. If you start with a huge project, you’ll find that you don’t even know where to begin. As a result, you’ll get bogged down doing little bits and pieces that have no tangible result, and it will seem like you’re not making any progress at all, and you’ll hit roadblocks that you don’t know how to overcome, simply to be left flailing for what to even work on next Trust me, Keep It Simple. If your first attempt at making a game turns out to be a one-room platformer with a bad collision, be proud of that because you built it. You actually got it done. You made a game. That’s more than most people ever manage. Get Feedback From the Start Play your game, and show it to your friends, and don’t worry when they don’t understand it or are critical because they’re still thinking in terms of the big-budget games they’re used to playing. *You* know how much work went into making that game. More importantly, you know that next time you’ll be able to do it even better and faster. Soon, you’ll be building games that people are asking you to let them play. The second thing to keep in mind, (and, I know that this is going to sound weird but) don’t go into your first game development with a specific idea.

Game Development: Indie VS AAA

There are many fine examples of indie games with low production values that have surpassed triple-A games on a regular basis Learn what you can do, and design around that. To clarify, don’t lock yourself into an idea and beat your head against it for weeks or months. Instead, learn a few tricks, watch a few tutorials, then start working towards something you’re pretty sure you can build. Its Okay If You Don’t Know Everything… It’s okay if there are still a few parts of it that you have no idea how to even start. But make sure it’s only a few parts when you’re breaking your projects down and planning things out. This brings us to tutorials. Any major engine has tons of people who happily make tutorials about pretty much everything. Go find them. Watch them. Study them. Then, if you’re stuck or if you can’t find an answer to your question, just ask or seek professional help. You’d be shocked at how many people are happy to help you through things if you just post on a forum or throw your thoughts onto the message boards. Don’t be afraid of coding. Lots of people say that they can’t code, but if you design your game right, you would be shocked at how little coding you have to do to get something done. …As Long as You Take Advantage of Your Strengths Design your game around *your* skills. Part of understanding your scope is understanding your resources and, in this case, *you* are your resources. Are you a great artist but you’ve never coded in your life?

Some Animators Hate The Future of The 3D Animation Industry!

It was 1832 when a creative artist started drawing some lines and shapes in a second-hand book and after opening the book, a little cute ball was moving back and forth on pages! This is the story of animation. 3D animation is using computers to create such thrilling hallucinations and it has steadily updated from Claymation to AI-based animations. In the following paragraphs, we are going to introduce future trends in the 3D animation industry.
The trends for the future of 3D animation consist of industrial, marketing, and technological changes. By industrial changes, we mean disrupting current processes to create animation such as combining 2D and 3D and when we talk about marketing changes, we mean utilizing animations to increase sales rates and generate more profits for many kinds of businesses. Technology also plays a big role in the future of 3D animation by introducing cloud infrastructure, machine learning, AI, and VR. Let’s get in the time machine to see the future of 3D animation!

3D animation as it is

When a 3D artist adds depth to still images, she or he is creating 3D animation. The most distinctive feature of 3D animation is bringing things to life and giving them the ability to get a more realistic connection with kids and adults. Before discussing the future of the 3D animation industry, we need to know more about this type of animation.
We also need to go through some market statistics to make predictions about the future of the 3D animation industry. An analytical report indicates that the global 3D animation market industry size was about $14 billion in 2018 while the number will be expected to reach $33 billion by the end of 2026. while many industries were hit by the pandemic, the 3D animation industry survived the harsh times. further, the report suggests that the industry can overcome the economic recession after covid-19 recovery. Moreover, researchers identified the most promising areas for the application of 3D animation which are media, entertainment, and healthcare. the latter would need more 3D animations in the next few years to produce bio-medical devices and examine patients more quickly.
How about the future? well, the only constant thing is the change. It means that key players in the 3D animation industry avidly look for modern tools and methods to improve their work processes and the final output they deliver. We are going to explore what will 3D animation industry be like in near future? will the future be a sort of Disney happily ever after or an apocalypse?!

According to Newzoo it is a good time to be a game developer! Without proper organization, the game development process may seem like it’s going nowhere. Pixune has quite a lot of collective game-making experience, so hopefully, some of our advice here will help you avoid the common pitfalls. So, let’s start with the most common and dangerous one. No matter the nature of your project, there are some principles that hold true.

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